TSUTSU BASICS

Tsutsu's functionality would command a building that would normally cost at least 3 times more than conventional commercial construction. However in this case the concept is so close to what Archimede builds since 1980 that we can safely assume its cost to be approximately 10% over that of quality local construction. This takes into account a better grade of column pads and reinforcement, telescopic connectors, flotation extras and other equipment (like...a sturdy anchor!) .
Now consider these advantages:
  • The concept is also a valide hurricane shelter, proven in at least one Force 5 hurricane.
  • In its daily incarnation, the building is a superb shell for all kinds of building programs, school, recreative center, administrative bldg., community center etc...Because the same injected foam that provides flotation along with superior tightness of the shell also allows for cheaper air conditioning. Indeed these are essentially the same as the arctic concept developed in the early 80's.
  • This is a cliché, of course, but life is priceless. We all had terrible heartaches to see innocent people drown and die as they were carried away along with mountains of floating debris. Those who survived had unbelievable puncture wounds from nails protruding from dislocated boards. Is it not fitting that these populations would deserve a high-tech concept that does not use nails, only a few bolts actually, in a configuration that allows distressed swimmers to climb aboard while totally protecting 200 more people.

TSUNAMI PROBABILITIES

A total of 482 tsunamis have been reported in the 20th Century alone, with at least 133 having a runup greater than 1.5 meters. We know that Japan, the West Coast of South America, Alaska, the Aleutian Islands, Kamchatka, and the Kuril Islands are potential tsunami generating areas. We know that these are the boundaries of major tectonic plates. But what about all the other subplates of the inland seas that have produced also the big destructive tsunamis and for which we have not established seismic gaps?

Where in the Pacific Ocean can we expect the big tsunamis in the 21st Century other than the areas mentioned? Let us be more specific. There are many tsuna A total of 482 tsunamis have been reported in the 20th Century alone, with at least 133 having a runup greater than 1.5 meters. We know that Japan, the West Coast of South America, Alaska, the Aleutian Islands, Kamchatka, and the Kuril Islands are potential tsunami generating areas. We know that these are the boundaries of major tectonic plates. But what about all the other subplates of the inland seas that have produced also the big destructive tsunamis and for which we have not established seismic gaps?

Where in the Pacific Ocean can we expect the big tsunamis in the 21st Century other than the areas mentioned? Let us be more specific. There are many tsunamigenic regions that have shown high density of seismic energy release and where large future tsunamis can be expected. For example, one such area is a segment of the Peruvian coastal region between 8.5° S and 14° S. This is a region of extremely high seismic energy release and site of large but infrequent historical tsunamis. Other parts of the South American seismic belt are tsunami gap regions and these regions in the 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries produced several destructive tsunamis, destroying such towns in Chile as Arica, Antofagasta and Valparaiso. There is also a great potential for another destructive tsunami on the Pacific side of Colombia, in the vicinity of the State of Narino. The west coast of Mexico can be expected to experience larger tsunamis. Large destructive tsunamis can be expected again in the Moro Gulf in the Philippines, in the Celebes and Sulu Sea, in the Java Sea and elsewhere in the South West Pacific.

migenic regions that have shown high density of seismic energy release and where large future tsunamis can be expected. For example, one such area is a segment of the Peruvian coastal region between 8.5° S and 14° S. This is a region of extremely high seismic energy release and site of large but infrequent historical tsunamis. Other parts of the South American seismic belt are tsunami gap regions and these regions in the 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries produced several destructive tsunamis, destroying such towns in Chile as Arica, Antofagasta and Valparaiso. There is also a great potential for another destructive tsunami on the Pacific side of Colombia, in the vicinity of the State of Narino. The west coast of Mexico can be expected to experience larger tsunamis. Large destructive tsunamis can be expected again in the Moro Gulf in the Philippines, in the Celebes and Sulu Sea, in the Java Sea and elsewhere in the South West Pacific.

DUTCH ANTILLES - The Guana Bay Condos - Pairs of condos


Again this project does not take advantage of all the possible groupings afforded by the tessalation possibilities of the rhombic dodecahedron geometry. Sutton did a much better job at this. However, the three-dimensional aspect was well integrated into the landscape and plantation, making a promedade around the resort quite enchanting. It is possible to glimpse at the sea around and under most condos, with openings between the stilts providing nice surprises to the walker.

CANADA - Mont Ste Anne QC- Ski Resorts on High Columns


Another interesting grouping, but this time with more identical units than the Sutton project. This 1984 project however is one of the highest, with the living modules well up into the braches of several large maple trees, providing exquisite views of the mountains all around.

CANADA - Sutton QC- Ski Resorts on Stilts



These condos built in 1983 are owned by The Club Archimede Vacation Club They are very popular, allowing 'ski-in/ski-out' access by simply skiing to your front door on the ground floor, with paths taking the shorter route UNDER other condos. The unique injected panels are sealed to each other along the edges of what are rhombododecahedral shells with incredible rigidity. The cavity under the floor is pressurized with warm air so that all floors are warm, the bathroom being the warmest of all because of the proximity of the electric furnace. An interesting design detail is that holes are drilled trough that floor into which short lengths of pipes are inserted. Over these pipes ski boots are inserted to have them warm and dried.


The lower level is where are stored skis and where the clothing is shed with cold air and snow remaining there before the skier goes upstairs to a snug and warm environment. The acoustic walls between units are built with a scientifically designed wall that only allows a few decibels to seep through, not enough to make the sounds identifiable. This great feature and the fact that the groupings on the ground naturally follow contours, flowing around large trees and forming lively clusters, the multiple views in each condos, all of it gives the entire place a vacation feeling that is well appreciated by a large return clientèle of families. In the summer, the condos are mostly fully rented, sometimes to groups like the Bar Association of Quebec.

Our Mexican Wall and Roof Paneling System

The wall and ceiling/roof panels are revolutionary and quickly spreading around the world. These Styrofoam core panels have a built-in steel mesh forming triangulated trusses within and a grid on both facings, apt to receive on inch of concrete on both sides. Thus a fireproof and 'rock-solid' panel is achieve, capable of high resistance to both lateral (hurricanes) and axial loads (earthquakes). A remarkable early application of these panels is the Tijuana-San Diego project of 1990 by Habitat for Humanity and Jimmy Carter. These 100 robust social houses were built by volunteers with as only tools pliers and tying wire. They were then concrete finished by a single Gunnite applicator. They can be seen today, still rock solid and pretty almost 20 years later.
Although we mostly endorse the concrete finished wall panels, two alternates exists that we use for areas without an adequate supply of concrete or concrete finished. These are the fiberglass 'Golden" sheets and the fibercement panels.

MEXICO- Primo Tapia BC - The Paraiso Prototyping Hill

Great news, bloggers, we have acquired hillside lots to allow prototyping of our newer models, testing them for human and physical interaction. This will allow confirmation of processes, costing, environmental resistance, but also as a way to confirm new ideas and try them out. Since none of these lots will be electrified for a few years, we are considering the use of a solar package in at least one of them.

Sincve we need to test our solutions in real-time, we have acquired lots where we will be building several portotype houses, each proving out a few of the newer techniques. One of these involves the Mexican polystyrene steel concrete shell technology as integrated in our own panel making ways. Some of these houses will eventually be sold when the utilities are brought in, the profits reinvested in the Institute for further development.

SINT MAARTEN - Guana Bay - Beach Condos that Successfully Weathered a Devastating Force 5 Hurricane


A pleasure it was to build in the sunny islands, with grateful owners and rental users year round. The unique geometry with the near absence of right angle corners inside and out still gives pleasure to thousands of visitors as can be seen in these web sites by owners.

VIETNAM - Nha Trang Projected Beach Retirement Community



Retirement clusters spread on a grand set of dunes by a lovely beach. On top, north American clusters where each owner is fully isolated from his neighbors in spite of the fact that they share a common plumbing and utilities core connection. Very economical, they provide privacy and comfort without wasting land use and grounds utilities.

In that project, the same basic arrangement is treated in the local idiom by simply changing the roof for synthetic grass over a membrane, also using local craftmen to decorate the panels prior to their erection. These are confined on a small island in the project were artists are invited to stay to create a restful haven for tourists and retirees, having flute players and teachers of Tai Chi and martial arts do demonstrations.

USA - Los Alamos NM- Ski Lodge From Our Oversized Panels























The Los Alamos Ski Club gave us a chance to try out a simple 3 story steel structure of our design and completely enclosed, roof and wall, with panels injected in our large presses. This plant of ours in Los Alamos innovate in several areas of machinery, methods and product. In the commercial construction field, steel shells are very suitable and popular. This building is still used very effectively 20 years later and its cost was an amazing $17 per ft2

Remarquably, this structure does not need any heating after 9AM in ski season. The body heat of skiers and cooking kitchen with the sun showing up through the large plate glass is more than enough to keep the shell toasty inside till late in the afternoon. R36 wall and roof panels along with supertight joint guarantee that result, along with properly oriented windows.

None of this is really surprising if one studies this text concerning steel clad urethane panels used since the late 40's. Their longevity and sustainability is simply amazing.

The Vietnam Beach Resort Project Near Nha Trang


Retirement clusters spread on a grand set of dunes by a lovely beach. On top, north American clusters where each owner is fully isolated from his neighbors in spite of the fact that they share a common plumbing and utilities core connection. Very economical, they provide privacy and comfort without wasting land use and grounds utilities.

In that project, the same basic arrangement is treated in the local idiom by simply changing the roof for synthetic grass over a membrane, also using local craftmen to decorate the panels prior to their erection. These are confined on a small island in the project were artists are invited to stay to create a restful haven for tourists and retirees, having flute players and teachers of Tai Chi and martial arts do demonstrations.

Living High

International Housing Industry Involvement -1972-2000



THE 'CONNECTORS' PROBLEM


Stick-built housing uses too many tiny connectors like nails, staples and small screws. Too many to easily inspect as too many miss their mark (this was shown in the forensic studies after Andrews stormed Homestead FL).

The New Mexico Technical Developments


The Los Alamos factory was built to develop three new technologies relating to foam injected paneling systems and other aspect of the Archimede construction techniques. All achieved complete proof of our starting hypothesis:
  • Extra-large panels from a new 'crossover platen press' ,
  • Built-in metal cladding system with concealed edges and hidden connectors,
  • Passive solar for commercial structures
  • Steel structural frames requiring little or no post-finishing.
One of the original partner in these ventures is Eric Treisman, a Santa Fe attorney still very active with the Institute. His long-standing involvement with North American native tribes and with Tibet has been a source of enlightment for all of us.

THE 'HEART-LUNG'MODULE



Photo above shows three 'wet modules' being built at Louisiana plant. These bathrooms are fully tested before being loaded in a container. Their corner posts projecting downward allow plumbers and electricians to go under if needed. These 'high heels' are simply cut-off with a chainsaw before loading. Containing the service entrance panel and the back 'wet' wall to the kitchen, those compact modules are the coe of all Archimede houses, removing at leat 50% of all technical tasks at the building site, speeding up assembly immensely. Below, a 120 m2 (1300 ft2) 2-story house that can be built for well below $50,000. A few of these were erected in Venezuela in 1994.





























At the right, the 'San Isidro' version of the house above as being completed in Isla Margarita VE. Note that three or more houses could be shipped into 2 40-ft containers and that erection time of these prior to stucco finish is only a matter of a few days, thanks in part to the fact that the more technically complex wet module carries most of the wiring and piping. This is why we at the Institute call this concept by Poirier the 'heart-lung' module of any house we fabricated.
It must be said however that the fact that all of these pressure-injected foam core panels are already prepared at the plant with doors and windows, also with notching for roof beams and other task requiring precision. Making these in a weather controlled plant having positioning fixtures or 'jig' is the way to go!

TSUNAMI 'FLOATING SOLUTION'

Although this house was designed for a flooding site, it could handle most tsunamis with its rigidity and steel clad paneled underbelly at a high stance. For the much less probable tsunamis that could rise above the door sills and create massive amounts of floating debris, we suggest soluble bolt anchors on top of each column. This way the house will float as a rigid unit capable of taking a lot of hits and yet remain safe. Of course a solid chain would tether it to a reliable point on the ground. This is not a compromise as both safety and practicality are maintained in a relatively low-cost house.

WHO COMES HERE - OUR TRAINING SEMINARS

We have a one-on-one training program for civil employees wanting to upgrade their palette of choices in the rebuilding arena. These two week seminars are held in Cantamar MX, and cost includes lodging in a beach condo as well as transit to and from the San Diego Airport. The cost of a complete session in $1000., including the documentation that is transferred from computer to computer. Trainees are invited to bring portable drives with at least 300 gigs of free space. Diplomas are given and most governments recognize our institution for tax purposes applied to professional training and career upgrading.